• The wreck of Messina Strait - Project 'ATLANTIS'

    First underwater research in the Messina Strait with 'COMUNE DI MESSINA, SOPRINTENDENZA DEL MARE , AURORA TRUST, BIMARIS EDIZIONI AND OLOTURIA SUB'. Supervisor: PROF. SEBASTIANO TUSA.

    published: 13 Jul 2013
  • The Sydney-Kormoran Project Shipwreck Expedition

    http://museum.wa.gov.au/explore/sydney/2015-expedition In May 2015, Curtin researchers participated in an eight-day expedition to the wrecks of the Australian light cruiser HMAS Sydney II and the German raider HSK Kormoran, which sank each other off Western Australia’s coast in November 1941. The wrecks lie in 2,500 metres of water, 20 kilometres apart, approximately 200 kilometres west of Shark Bay. The Sydney-Kormoran Project, a collaboration between the WA Museum, Curtin University, and offshore services company DOF Subsea, is using the latest imaging technology to capture the unique heritage value of the two ships so they can be investigated, managed and interpreted for future generations. Researchers are working toward the development of an interactive 3D model of the wrecks that w...

    published: 16 Dec 2015
  • Nord Stream Sponsoring HUMA

    The Baltic Sea is home to many archaeological treasures and ship wrecks from various eras which are widely undiscovered. The project Heritage Underwater -- Maritime Archaeology (HUMA) focuses on the exploration and documentation of wrecks of the Danish-Lübeckish fleet, which sank near the island of Gotland, Sweden in during the Nordic Seven Years' War in the 16th century. For Nord Stream, the HUMA project provides an opportunity to demonstrate the company's responsible approach to underwater research. For more information, please visit our website at http://www.nord-stream.com

    published: 02 May 2011
  • Ocean Tech Marine Research Project, July 2016

    http://bernews.com | Bermuda | ------------------------------------------------------------------------: Subscribe to YouTube Channel http://goo.gl/XngPEV Join us on Facebook: http://facebook.com/bernews Join us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/bernewsdotcom Join us on Instagram: http://instagram.com/bernews Follow our Periscope for live video: https://www.periscope.tv/bernews Download our mobile app: http://bernews.com/app/ Sign up for our email list: http://bernews.com/emails

    published: 07 Jul 2016
  • 19 Most Famous Shipwrecks

    After a life at sea, where do ships and submarines go when they retire? Why, they haunt still shores or stayed beached on dry land as they slowly rust and erode. Here are some of the most famous shipwrecks where they ended up. Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr 10. Sleeping Bear The shipwrecks found beneath the water’s surface in Sleeping Bear on located near the Lower Peninsula of Lake MIchigan. A famous ship found here was the Francisco Morazan, which sailed off from the city of Chicago back in 1960. There was over 940 tons of cargo when it was met with fog and snow, which proved too much for the ship. In the end, it was abandoned by the next month, which left the ship to just sink and rust into the lake waters since the owners of the ship were never found and there was n...

    published: 16 Jun 2017
  • MHM, Wooden Boat Wreck, Anomaly 38

    Searching for and finding an unknown wooden boat wreck, as part of Maritime Heritage Minnesota's (MHM), Lake Minnetonka, nautical archaeology research project. Discovery and documenting of this wreck took place on June 20th, 2014. Maritime Historians and Nautical Archaeologists: Ann Merriman PhD Christopher Olson MA CREW: Ann Merriman SCUBA divers: Christopher Olson Mark Slick VIDEOGRAPHER: Mark Slick...m.slickimages

    published: 22 Jun 2014
  • The Joint Research Project in Godawaya, Srilanka, December 2010 Part 1

    An international team comprised of experts in diving and underwater archaeology from Srilanka, India, Indonesia, Malaysia and the Phillipines participated in the assessment of a shipwreck at Godawaya, Srilanka. The shipwreck is lying or trapped in an isolated reef (which virtually surrounded the wreck and only the northeastern part is exposed) in 31 m water depth. The observation of surface distribution suggests that the site is spread over an area of 40 m by 22 m. The important findings include various sizes of jars, carinated cooking vessels, quern stones and unidentified cargo and possible ship structure. Comparative study of pottery and stone artefacts indicate a possible time bracket for this wreck to be between the 4th century BC and the 2nd century AD.

    published: 13 Feb 2012
  • Explorers who found 116-year-old ghostly ship wreck are stunned by what's inside

    A ghostly shipwreck that looked like something from Pirates of the Caribbean has been discovered with hidden treasures on board. Eerie footage shows that on deck and inside the rooms, everything is perfectly preserved - with a few added barnacles of course. The John V Moran has been found at the bottom of Lake Michigan in the northern United States after 116 years and it's in such good condition the glass in some of the windows remains intact. The steamship was discovered by the Michigan Shipwreck Research Association off the coast of Muskegon last month during a sonar search. Because she sits under 365 feet of lake water they waited for warmer weather to take the plunge along with the Michigan State Police Underwater Recovery Unit. Association boss Craig Rich said: "Not a railing is ...

    published: 24 Jul 2015
  • U.S. NAVAL RESEARCH PROJECT ALVIN SUBMERSIBLE DSV-2 WOODS HOLE INSTITUTE 50654

    This rare film shows the design and construction of the Alvin submersible DSV-2, made in conjunction with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute. A groundbreaking craft, Alvin was designed as a replacement for bathyscaphes and other less maneuverable oceanographic vehicles. Its more nimble design was made possible in part by the development of syntactic foam, which is buoyant and yet strong enough to serve as a structural material at great depths. The vessel weighs 17 tons. It allows for two scientists and one pilot to dive for up to nine hours at 4,500 metres (14,800 ft). The submersible features two robotic arms and can be fitted with mission-specific sampling and experimental gear. The plug hatch of the vessel is 0.48 metres (1 ft 7 in) in diameter and somewhat thicker than the 2-inch ...

    published: 29 Dec 2016
  • The Shipwreck Project - Wreck ID

    A large school of fish off the east side of Portland allow divers to locate a nearby wreck. A great example of shipwrecks of the past (even as recent as 2 years ago) act as artificial reefs and are so much worth exploring. recent wreck. Showing how life (and schools) gather underwater. For more information and news visit http://www.facebook.com/theshipwreckproject

    published: 16 Aug 2013
  • Titanic Research

    project for school

    published: 24 May 2012
  • Miley Cyrus - Wrecking Ball

    Miley Cyrus' official music video for 'Wrecking Ball'. Click to listen to Miley Cyrus on Spotify: http://smarturl.it/MCSpot?IQid=MCWB As featured on Bangerz. Click to buy the track or album via iTunes: http://smarturl.it/MCBAiTunes?IQid=MCWB Google Play: http://smarturl.it/MCWBPlay?IQid=MCWB Amazon: http://smarturl.it/MCBAm?IQid=MCWB More from Miley Cyrus We Can't Stop: https://youtu.be/LrUvu1mlWco Can't Be Tamed: https://youtu.be/sjSG6z_13-Q Who Owns My Heart: https://youtu.be/iVbQxC2c3-8 Follow Miley Cyrus Website: http://www.mileycyrus.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MileyCyrus Twitter: https://twitter.com/MileyCyrus Instagram: https://instagram.com/mileycyrus/ Subscribe to Miley Cyrus on YouTube: http://smarturl.it/MCSub?IQid=MCWB More great Ultimate Hits of the Noughties ...

    published: 09 Sep 2013
  • ► Adventure Ocean Quest - Fragile Mediterranean (FULL Documentary)

    The Mediterranean Sea is a world of impressive diversity where ocean sunfish and whales live side by side, and colourful corals provide a home for smaller creatures. But human beings have left their mark here for thousands of years: ancient shipwrecks and fighter planes from the Second World War litter the ocean floor, while until recently raw sewage was fed straight into the sea. The impact has been devastating – today the Mediterranean is an ecosystem on the edge. But there is a glimmer of hope as measures to protect the sea from pollution and excessive disturbance are being put into place. Sandrine Ruiton from the University of Marseille specialises in research on artificial reefs to build up the lost marine biodiversity near cities like Marseille, one of the Mediterranean’s busiest po...

    published: 13 Nov 2015
  • MME-The Viscount Melbourne- Finding & Identifying the Wreck

    Roze Berekoven tells us how they got involved in marine archaeology and the research that lead them to finding the wreck of the Viscount Melbourne. Husband and wife team, Hans and Roze Berekoven are the Maritime Mysteries Explorers. They are self-taught marine archaeologists and researchers. The Berekoven's narrowed down a possible site of the wreck just off a reef in the South Luconia Shoals area of the South China Sea after researching various accounts of the ship's journey from Singapore. This lead them to conduct a survey of this area which eventually yielded evidence of the wreck and the discovery of the resting place of the HMS Viscount Melbourne. The videos posted on this channel will become part of a documentary series developed by the Berekoven's, Eric Madeja of Treasure Imag...

    published: 06 Oct 2012
  • Rutland Island Wreck 2012

    Over the last four years, the Underwater Archaeology Unit (UAU), National Monuments Service in the Department of Arts, Heritage & the Gaeltacht has been carrying out survey and excavation at a wreck site near Rutland Island in Burtonport harbour, County Donegal. The wreck was discovered by local divers in 2009 and reported to the UAU. In cooperation with the local divers, the UAU undertook initial survey at the site and it was obvious that the substantial remains of a wooden wreck were preserved in the seabed. Work at the site has continued each summer since, with the wreck slowly being revealed over the course of the time on site. The scale of the project became such that a larger dive platform was needed, as was more detailed seabed mapping of the site and collaboration between the Depar...

    published: 28 May 2013
  • Wreck 'Em TV - Pink Treadmill Project - Feb. 10, 2010

    Travis Cram of the Texas Tech Official Sports Report talks with Texas Tech women's basketball head coach Kristy Curry about a special event in February.

    published: 10 Feb 2010
The wreck of Messina Strait - Project 'ATLANTIS'

The wreck of Messina Strait - Project 'ATLANTIS'

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:05
  • Updated: 13 Jul 2013
  • views: 1247
videos
First underwater research in the Messina Strait with 'COMUNE DI MESSINA, SOPRINTENDENZA DEL MARE , AURORA TRUST, BIMARIS EDIZIONI AND OLOTURIA SUB'. Supervisor: PROF. SEBASTIANO TUSA.
https://wn.com/The_Wreck_Of_Messina_Strait_Project_'ATLANTIS'
The Sydney-Kormoran Project Shipwreck Expedition

The Sydney-Kormoran Project Shipwreck Expedition

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:30:49
  • Updated: 16 Dec 2015
  • views: 5997
videos
http://museum.wa.gov.au/explore/sydney/2015-expedition In May 2015, Curtin researchers participated in an eight-day expedition to the wrecks of the Australian light cruiser HMAS Sydney II and the German raider HSK Kormoran, which sank each other off Western Australia’s coast in November 1941. The wrecks lie in 2,500 metres of water, 20 kilometres apart, approximately 200 kilometres west of Shark Bay. The Sydney-Kormoran Project, a collaboration between the WA Museum, Curtin University, and offshore services company DOF Subsea, is using the latest imaging technology to capture the unique heritage value of the two ships so they can be investigated, managed and interpreted for future generations. Researchers are working toward the development of an interactive 3D model of the wrecks that will become the basis for a new museum exhibition, giving visitors an interactive and immersive experience of the wreck sites. Explore more research at Curtin Univesity: http://research.curtin.edu.au/
https://wn.com/The_Sydney_Kormoran_Project_Shipwreck_Expedition
Nord Stream Sponsoring HUMA

Nord Stream Sponsoring HUMA

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:59
  • Updated: 02 May 2011
  • views: 282
videos
The Baltic Sea is home to many archaeological treasures and ship wrecks from various eras which are widely undiscovered. The project Heritage Underwater -- Maritime Archaeology (HUMA) focuses on the exploration and documentation of wrecks of the Danish-Lübeckish fleet, which sank near the island of Gotland, Sweden in during the Nordic Seven Years' War in the 16th century. For Nord Stream, the HUMA project provides an opportunity to demonstrate the company's responsible approach to underwater research. For more information, please visit our website at http://www.nord-stream.com
https://wn.com/Nord_Stream_Sponsoring_Huma
Ocean Tech Marine Research Project, July 2016

Ocean Tech Marine Research Project, July 2016

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:44
  • Updated: 07 Jul 2016
  • views: 422
videos
http://bernews.com | Bermuda | ------------------------------------------------------------------------: Subscribe to YouTube Channel http://goo.gl/XngPEV Join us on Facebook: http://facebook.com/bernews Join us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/bernewsdotcom Join us on Instagram: http://instagram.com/bernews Follow our Periscope for live video: https://www.periscope.tv/bernews Download our mobile app: http://bernews.com/app/ Sign up for our email list: http://bernews.com/emails
https://wn.com/Ocean_Tech_Marine_Research_Project,_July_2016
19 Most Famous Shipwrecks

19 Most Famous Shipwrecks

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:36
  • Updated: 16 Jun 2017
  • views: 189235
videos
After a life at sea, where do ships and submarines go when they retire? Why, they haunt still shores or stayed beached on dry land as they slowly rust and erode. Here are some of the most famous shipwrecks where they ended up. Subscribe to Talltanic http://goo.gl/wgfvrr 10. Sleeping Bear The shipwrecks found beneath the water’s surface in Sleeping Bear on located near the Lower Peninsula of Lake MIchigan. A famous ship found here was the Francisco Morazan, which sailed off from the city of Chicago back in 1960. There was over 940 tons of cargo when it was met with fog and snow, which proved too much for the ship. In the end, it was abandoned by the next month, which left the ship to just sink and rust into the lake waters since the owners of the ship were never found and there was no one to deal with the removal of it from the water. 9. Landévennec This ship yard is located along the Aulne River in north west France. Most of the ships seen here are military vessels near Pen Forn. The mountains surrounding the waters not only help it the site from being an eyesore, but their presence apparently help keep the water calm, ultimately making for a smoother decomposition of the old ships to disintegrate better. 8. Alexandrovsk-Sakhalinsky On the shores of this Russian town are lines of old submarines that sit decomposing in the water. These abandoned submarines are partially sunk in the water as they just await to rust. No one is sure just how many submarines can be found in these waters, nor is much else known about their condition or purpose. 7. Bikini Atoll Bikini Atoll is known as being a nuclear testing site, and it’s also a location where ships have sunk, creating an old shipyard site for the old sea vessels. The ships were part of atomic tests during the 1940s, one such being the USS Independence. Not only that, but there’s aid to be over 55 gallons of radioactive waste in drums dumped here as well. The USS Saratoga lies here as well, with a lot of the vessels found here having been forgotten about. 6. Sha’b Abu Nuhas In the depths of the Red Sea is a location referred to as the Wrecks of Abu Nuhas. It is the site of at least 7 shipwrecks that lie near the triangle shaped coral reef near the north western part of Shadwan Island. Of the ships were is the SS Carnatic, Olden, Kimon M, and as seen pictured here, The Giannis D. Divers come here all the time to check out the metal ruins of old ships that have met their demise in the open waters. Along with the rusted metal is a diverse amount of wildlife that also makes it a popular diving site. 5. Jervois Basin This body of water is seen an unfit for swimming, but that doesn’t stop people from checking out the wrecks found at the Jervois Basin in South Australia near the upper region of Port Adelaide River. Here you can see the skeletal remains of old ships in the process of ship breaking. It’s not the active ship breaking yard it once ways, and remnants of that part of history can still be seen here. 4. Curtin Artificial Reef It is one of the largest Reef Projects in the world and has been a site of wrecked sea vessels since 1968. Since then there have been over 32 ships, buoys, cars, and other pieces of vehicles and vessels that have been allowed to sink and become part of the reef. This shipwreck in Australia was established by the Underwater Research Group of Queensland and is a project that has attracted much more marine life to the waters. 3. Aral Sea The dry sand pictured here would be the last place you think you’d see so many ships come together as they sit all run down in the sun, and yet the ships on the Aral Sea are some of the most prominent and famous in the world. Located in a basin in the border of the countries of Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan, the shipwrecks of the Aral Sea have been a strange sight to behold ever since the level of the sea started to rapidly decline by the 1960s. 2. Skeleton Coast If these skull and crossbones gates are anything to go by, it the fact that Skeleton Coast in Namibia are one of the most well known shipwrecks in the world. Skeleton Coast is found along the coast of Namibia along a coast that touches that Atlantic Ocean. Rusted ships have been beached here, the environment rusting and breaking them down to seem like skeletal formations along the beach. Gadani This is one of the top 3 largest ship breaking yards in the world and is still one of the most active. Gadani, located 50 miles northwest of Karachi, Pakistan, is a yard that is the location of 132 ship breaking plots. A few decades ago, it was the largest ship breaking yard in the world, and even now that it has been surpassed on that front, it is still one of the most well known and leads the world in its ship breaking efficiency.
https://wn.com/19_Most_Famous_Shipwrecks
MHM, Wooden Boat Wreck, Anomaly 38

MHM, Wooden Boat Wreck, Anomaly 38

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:51
  • Updated: 22 Jun 2014
  • views: 190
videos
Searching for and finding an unknown wooden boat wreck, as part of Maritime Heritage Minnesota's (MHM), Lake Minnetonka, nautical archaeology research project. Discovery and documenting of this wreck took place on June 20th, 2014. Maritime Historians and Nautical Archaeologists: Ann Merriman PhD Christopher Olson MA CREW: Ann Merriman SCUBA divers: Christopher Olson Mark Slick VIDEOGRAPHER: Mark Slick...m.slickimages
https://wn.com/Mhm,_Wooden_Boat_Wreck,_Anomaly_38
The Joint Research Project in Godawaya, Srilanka, December 2010 Part 1

The Joint Research Project in Godawaya, Srilanka, December 2010 Part 1

  • Order:
  • Duration: 10:51
  • Updated: 13 Feb 2012
  • views: 293
videos
An international team comprised of experts in diving and underwater archaeology from Srilanka, India, Indonesia, Malaysia and the Phillipines participated in the assessment of a shipwreck at Godawaya, Srilanka. The shipwreck is lying or trapped in an isolated reef (which virtually surrounded the wreck and only the northeastern part is exposed) in 31 m water depth. The observation of surface distribution suggests that the site is spread over an area of 40 m by 22 m. The important findings include various sizes of jars, carinated cooking vessels, quern stones and unidentified cargo and possible ship structure. Comparative study of pottery and stone artefacts indicate a possible time bracket for this wreck to be between the 4th century BC and the 2nd century AD.
https://wn.com/The_Joint_Research_Project_In_Godawaya,_Srilanka,_December_2010_Part_1
Explorers who found 116-year-old ghostly ship wreck are stunned by what's inside

Explorers who found 116-year-old ghostly ship wreck are stunned by what's inside

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:49
  • Updated: 24 Jul 2015
  • views: 193680
videos
A ghostly shipwreck that looked like something from Pirates of the Caribbean has been discovered with hidden treasures on board. Eerie footage shows that on deck and inside the rooms, everything is perfectly preserved - with a few added barnacles of course. The John V Moran has been found at the bottom of Lake Michigan in the northern United States after 116 years and it's in such good condition the glass in some of the windows remains intact. The steamship was discovered by the Michigan Shipwreck Research Association off the coast of Muskegon last month during a sonar search. Because she sits under 365 feet of lake water they waited for warmer weather to take the plunge along with the Michigan State Police Underwater Recovery Unit. Association boss Craig Rich said: "Not a railing is missing. The mast is standing. The lights are standing. "The anchors are in position. There’s even glass still in the windows.” “The only thing missing from this wreck is the smokestack.” The vessel was among many steamers owned by Capt. Edward Gifford Crosby who later died on the Titanic. According to the Grand Rapids Press the last time anyone saw the Moran was Sunday, February 12, 1899. The 214-foot ship was only 11 years old when she took her final voyage carrying a cargo of flour, animal feed, peas, oil cake and miscellaneous freight. Ice punched a hole in the hull and the ship began to flood. As water began to overwhelm the pumps, Capt. John McLeod ordered the crew of 24 into the lifeboats. Thankfully for the crew, the Moran had been paced across the lake by her sister steamer Naomi, which heard the distress whistle and the crew were rescued. John V. Moran shipwreck. Deep in Lake Michigan, divers find pristine shipwreck lost in 1899. Intact 1899 Shipwreck Found At The Bottom Of Lake Michigan. Historic shipwreck identified in Lake Michigan. John V. Moran shipwreck uncovered, over 100 years old at bottom of Lake Michigan. Shipwreck May Be Most Intact, Deepest Ever Found in Lake Michigan. Historic shipwreck identified in Lake Michigan. Click link to subscribe to Red Phoenix Channel : http://www.youtube.com/user/TheRedPhoenixOne?sub_confirmation=1 Click to view this channel for more videos : https://www.youtube.com/user/TheRedPhoenixOne
https://wn.com/Explorers_Who_Found_116_Year_Old_Ghostly_Ship_Wreck_Are_Stunned_By_What's_Inside
U.S. NAVAL RESEARCH PROJECT ALVIN SUBMERSIBLE DSV-2 WOODS HOLE INSTITUTE 50654

U.S. NAVAL RESEARCH PROJECT ALVIN SUBMERSIBLE DSV-2 WOODS HOLE INSTITUTE 50654

  • Order:
  • Duration: 14:04
  • Updated: 29 Dec 2016
  • views: 576
videos
This rare film shows the design and construction of the Alvin submersible DSV-2, made in conjunction with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute. A groundbreaking craft, Alvin was designed as a replacement for bathyscaphes and other less maneuverable oceanographic vehicles. Its more nimble design was made possible in part by the development of syntactic foam, which is buoyant and yet strong enough to serve as a structural material at great depths. The vessel weighs 17 tons. It allows for two scientists and one pilot to dive for up to nine hours at 4,500 metres (14,800 ft). The submersible features two robotic arms and can be fitted with mission-specific sampling and experimental gear. The plug hatch of the vessel is 0.48 metres (1 ft 7 in) in diameter and somewhat thicker than the 2-inch (51 mm) thick titanium sphere pressure hull; it is held in place by the pressure of the water above it. In an emergency, if Alvin were stuck underwater with occupants inside, the outer body, or cladding, of the submersible could be released and discarded using controls inside the hull. The titanium sphere would then rise to the surface uncontrolled. Alvin, first of its ship class of deep submergence vehicle (DSV), was built to dive to 2,440 metres (8,010 ft). Each of the Alvin-class DSVs have different depth capabilities. However Alvin is the only one seconded to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), with the others staying with the United States Navy. Alvin's first deep sea tests took place off Andros Island, the Bahamas, where it made a successful 12-hour, unmanned tethered 7,500-foot (2,300 m) test dive. On 20 July 1965 Alvin made its first 6,000-foot (1,800 m) manned dive for the Navy to obtain certification. On 17 March 1966, Alvin was used to locate a submerged 1.45-megaton hydrogen bomb lost in a United States Air Force midair accident over Palomares, Spain. The bomb, found resting nearly 910 metres (2,990 ft) deep, was raised intact on 7 April. Alvin (DSV-2) is a manned deep-ocean research submersible owned by the United States Navy and operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. The vehicle was built by General Mills' Electronics Group in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Named to honor the prime mover and creative inspiration for the vehicle, Allyn Vine, Alvin was commissioned on 5 June 1964. The submersible is launched from the deep submergence support vessel RV Atlantis (AGOR-25), which is also owned by the U.S. Navy and operated by WHOI. The submersible has made more than 4,400 dives, carrying two scientists and a pilot, to observe the lifeforms that must cope with super-pressures and move about in total darkness, as well as exploring the wreck of Titanic. Research conducted by Alvin has been featured in nearly 2,000 scientific papers. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
https://wn.com/U.S._Naval_Research_Project_Alvin_Submersible_Dsv_2_Woods_Hole_Institute_50654
The Shipwreck Project - Wreck ID

The Shipwreck Project - Wreck ID

  • Order:
  • Duration: 0:31
  • Updated: 16 Aug 2013
  • views: 48
videos
A large school of fish off the east side of Portland allow divers to locate a nearby wreck. A great example of shipwrecks of the past (even as recent as 2 years ago) act as artificial reefs and are so much worth exploring. recent wreck. Showing how life (and schools) gather underwater. For more information and news visit http://www.facebook.com/theshipwreckproject
https://wn.com/The_Shipwreck_Project_Wreck_Id
Titanic Research

Titanic Research

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:41
  • Updated: 24 May 2012
  • views: 1004
videos
project for school
https://wn.com/Titanic_Research
Miley Cyrus - Wrecking Ball

Miley Cyrus - Wrecking Ball

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:42
  • Updated: 09 Sep 2013
  • views: 892607633
videos
Miley Cyrus' official music video for 'Wrecking Ball'. Click to listen to Miley Cyrus on Spotify: http://smarturl.it/MCSpot?IQid=MCWB As featured on Bangerz. Click to buy the track or album via iTunes: http://smarturl.it/MCBAiTunes?IQid=MCWB Google Play: http://smarturl.it/MCWBPlay?IQid=MCWB Amazon: http://smarturl.it/MCBAm?IQid=MCWB More from Miley Cyrus We Can't Stop: https://youtu.be/LrUvu1mlWco Can't Be Tamed: https://youtu.be/sjSG6z_13-Q Who Owns My Heart: https://youtu.be/iVbQxC2c3-8 Follow Miley Cyrus Website: http://www.mileycyrus.com/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MileyCyrus Twitter: https://twitter.com/MileyCyrus Instagram: https://instagram.com/mileycyrus/ Subscribe to Miley Cyrus on YouTube: http://smarturl.it/MCSub?IQid=MCWB More great Ultimate Hits of the Noughties videos here: http://smarturl.it/UNPlaylist?IQid=MCWB --------- Lyrics: We clawed, we chained our hearts in vain We jumped never asking why We kissed, I fell under your spell. A love no onecould deny Don't you ever say I just walked away I will always want you I can't live a lie, running for my life I will always want you I came in like a wrecking ball I never hit so hard in love All I wanted was to break your walls All you ever did was wreck me Yeah, you, you wreck me
https://wn.com/Miley_Cyrus_Wrecking_Ball
► Adventure Ocean Quest - Fragile Mediterranean (FULL Documentary)

► Adventure Ocean Quest - Fragile Mediterranean (FULL Documentary)

  • Order:
  • Duration: 52:09
  • Updated: 13 Nov 2015
  • views: 33242
videos
The Mediterranean Sea is a world of impressive diversity where ocean sunfish and whales live side by side, and colourful corals provide a home for smaller creatures. But human beings have left their mark here for thousands of years: ancient shipwrecks and fighter planes from the Second World War litter the ocean floor, while until recently raw sewage was fed straight into the sea. The impact has been devastating – today the Mediterranean is an ecosystem on the edge. But there is a glimmer of hope as measures to protect the sea from pollution and excessive disturbance are being put into place. Sandrine Ruiton from the University of Marseille specialises in research on artificial reefs to build up the lost marine biodiversity near cities like Marseille, one of the Mediterranean’s busiest ports. Until recently it was responsible for seriously polluting the surrounding Mediterranean Sea. Christian Petron himself has been instrumental in raising awareness of this ecosystem in dire straights. His own 30-year-old archive footage shows the extent of the pollution in graphic detail. Both Sandrine Ruiton and Christian are involved in the hugely successful ‘Prado Reef 2006’ project, which is designed to repopulate the local waters by encouraging the colonisation of new reefs. Even old shipwrecks and fighter planes turned into artificial reefs and first indications offer grounds for cautious optimism. But to be able to accurately assess the success of these artificial reefs, detailed population counts are absolutely essential. But their accuracy is questionable when carried out by divers with conventional equipment – reef creatures are notoriously shy and many are likely to hide at the approach of a noisy diver. So Sandrine Ruiton wants to find out if Frederic can achieve more accurate population counts on these fragile reefs by being less intrusive. His ability to move and behave almost like a fish without any cumbersome diving equipment allows him closer access without frightening the wildlife off. His first destination is the wreck of an freighter, sunk after world-war 2, closely followed and observed by Christian Petron. The collection of creatures found here are delicate and extremely cautious. But this dive also poses real challenges for Fred: diving in a wreck brings particular dangers with it, especially for a freediver. Nevertheless, he is determined to press on with his attempt to evaluate the state of Mediterranean marine wildlife. The artificial reef population surveys are only part of the reason why Frederic has come to the Mediterranean. He also works together with Dr. Pierre Chevaldonne, a scientist at the ‘Station Marine D’Endoume/Marseille’. Both are interested in an underwater cave that could be invaluable to modern science. Organisms and animals that are usually associated with much deeper waters thrive in this deep dark cave. In particular a collection of sponges could be of interest, not just because they provide an endless supply of biomarkers that are very sensitive to environmental changes: they are also highly relevant for modern medicine. Sponges are known to provide AZT (Azido-Thymidin) – currently one of the most used medications for the treatment of AIDS and in the fight against cancer. The sponges generate these substances as dangerous chemical weapons against predators or as a defence against harmful bacteria. The research team is renowned for their work on sponges, but the breathing bubbles emitted by conventional drivers would collect at the cave ceiling and gradually kill the cave dwellers. But Frederic’s approach is very different. By holding his breath, he can ensure that the sponges and other cave organisms are not threatened. He is able to explore the cave in detail and report his findings and bring samples back to the research group. This research can provide ground-breaking insights into modern medicine, as well as giving an indication of the health of the Mediterranean waters by examining the sponges’ biomarkers. Together, Frederic’s involvement in the artificial reef projects as well as the underwater cave exploration are extremely valuable contributions to the quest to document and protect the diversity of Mediterranean marine wildlife. He is in a unique position to access and approach the wildlife, that cannot be replicated by using conventional diving methods, and as such is an incredible opportunity for the scientists to gain a new window to the underwater life of the Mediterranean.
https://wn.com/►_Adventure_Ocean_Quest_Fragile_Mediterranean_(Full_Documentary)
MME-The Viscount Melbourne- Finding & Identifying the Wreck

MME-The Viscount Melbourne- Finding & Identifying the Wreck

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  • Duration: 5:14
  • Updated: 06 Oct 2012
  • views: 108
videos
Roze Berekoven tells us how they got involved in marine archaeology and the research that lead them to finding the wreck of the Viscount Melbourne. Husband and wife team, Hans and Roze Berekoven are the Maritime Mysteries Explorers. They are self-taught marine archaeologists and researchers. The Berekoven's narrowed down a possible site of the wreck just off a reef in the South Luconia Shoals area of the South China Sea after researching various accounts of the ship's journey from Singapore. This lead them to conduct a survey of this area which eventually yielded evidence of the wreck and the discovery of the resting place of the HMS Viscount Melbourne. The videos posted on this channel will become part of a documentary series developed by the Berekoven's, Eric Madeja of Treasure Images Sdn Bhd and Clifford Terry. More information is available on their blog, http://berekoven54.blogspot.com.au/. Inquiries can be directed to editor@treasure-images.com , berekoven54@gmail.com, or cwterry5@gmail.com.
https://wn.com/Mme_The_Viscount_Melbourne_Finding_Identifying_The_Wreck
Rutland Island Wreck 2012

Rutland Island Wreck 2012

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  • Duration: 9:15
  • Updated: 28 May 2013
  • views: 1481
videos
Over the last four years, the Underwater Archaeology Unit (UAU), National Monuments Service in the Department of Arts, Heritage & the Gaeltacht has been carrying out survey and excavation at a wreck site near Rutland Island in Burtonport harbour, County Donegal. The wreck was discovered by local divers in 2009 and reported to the UAU. In cooperation with the local divers, the UAU undertook initial survey at the site and it was obvious that the substantial remains of a wooden wreck were preserved in the seabed. Work at the site has continued each summer since, with the wreck slowly being revealed over the course of the time on site. The scale of the project became such that a larger dive platform was needed, as was more detailed seabed mapping of the site and collaboration between the Department and the Geological Survey of Ireland/INFOMAR has been ongoing since 2011. The GSI/INFOMAR vessels RV Keary and RV Geo have been providing logistical dive support to the UAU for the project, as well as mapping the harbour as part of their own seabed mapping programme. Measuring some 20m in length, the lower part of the starboard side of the ship lies buried in the sandy bed of the harbour. Constructed of oak, artefactual material recovered so far tells the story of an armed vessel, which carried Iberian wares and barrels. Cannon balls, musket balls and the remains of a musketeer's bandolier all point to a ship that was prepared for engagement but the broken up barrels, galley bricks and utilitarian wares, including a beautiful wooden bowl also hint at life on board the ill-fated vessel. As currently known through artefactual material, the wreck may date to the latter part of the 16th century or early part of the 17th century. Dendrochronological samples, being analysed and dated by Dr. Aoife Daly, may provide more definitive dating results in the near future. The work of the UAU is seeking to determine the nature and extent of the site, with a view to the full excavation of the internal area of the remains of the wreck and recovery of all artefactual material contained within it. The National Museum of Ireland will be carrying out the conservation of the material in co-operation with the UAU. The remains of the wreck itself will be left in situ. Further collaboration with Dr. David Gregory of the Museum of Denmark on preservation in situ techniques are looking to formulate a longterm management and preservation strategy for the Rutland Island Wreck site. The UAU is returning to the site this coming summer to complete the internal excavation of the wreck where it is hope that more information can be gleaned from this mysterious shipwreck. Under the 1987 National Monuments (Amendment) Act in Ireland, all wrecks over 100-years old are protected. Under this legislation anyone undertaking a dive, remote sensing survey or more intrusive investigation on a protected wreck site must make an application to the Licensing Sections, National Monuments Service, Department of Arts, Heritage & the Gaeltacht to do so. Licenses are issued subject to conditions, and for any intrusive work a detailed research strategy and methodology must also be agreed in advance between the applicant and the relevant national institutions. Strict penalties apply for breech of conditions, including a severe fine and/or prison sentence, depending on the nature and extent of damage to a protected wreck site.
https://wn.com/Rutland_Island_Wreck_2012
Wreck 'Em TV - Pink Treadmill Project - Feb. 10, 2010

Wreck 'Em TV - Pink Treadmill Project - Feb. 10, 2010

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  • Duration: 3:44
  • Updated: 10 Feb 2010
  • views: 178
videos
Travis Cram of the Texas Tech Official Sports Report talks with Texas Tech women's basketball head coach Kristy Curry about a special event in February.
https://wn.com/Wreck_'Em_Tv_Pink_Treadmill_Project_Feb._10,_2010
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